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Don’t Miss Out!! – Upcoming @ The Korea Society

Written by: FFT Webmaster | March 9th, 2011

The Korea Society: Upcoming Programs
10,000 Threads Around the World
In conjunction with the gallery exhibition 10,000 Threads, acclaimed author Spike Gillespie explores the diversity and common threads of quilting in Korea, its neighbors, and lands beyond. Gillespie takes the listener on a global journey of the art, approaches, and techniques of quilt making.

Tuesday, March 8
6:00PM  Registration and Refreshments
6:30PM  Gallery Talk and Q&A

RSVP FOR EXPLORE KOREA CARDHOLDERS

Explore Korea cardholders attend this program for free!
All other cardholders and non-members must buy tickets.

BUY TICKETS

Asia Week 2011 Gallery Talk
10,000 Threads Around the World
with
Spike Gillespie
Author, Quilts Around the World: The Story of Quilting from Alabama to Zimbabwe
The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor

$10 (Members/Students); $20 (Guests)
(Walk-in registration will incur an additional charge of $5)

About the Speaker
Spike Gillespie is the author of six books, three of which are on the topic of quilting. Her most recent book, Quilts Around the World: The Story of Quilting from Alabama to Zimbabwe, traces the history of quilting from its beginnings to today. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Smithsonian, National Geographic Traveler, and other publications. In 2006, Austin Chronicle readers voted her Best Author in Austin, Texas.

Traditional Music and its Role in Contemporary Korea

Robert C. Provine, professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Music, will examine the remarkable resurgence of traditional music at The Korea Society on April 1, 2010. Using a multimedia presentation, Provine will introduce the audience to the main instruments and genres of Korean traditional music, as well as the role the music plays in contemporary South Korea.

Thursday, March 10 @ 6:30 PM

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The talk will include a discussion of the term “music” in a Korean context, beginning with an outline of the history of Korean music and its sources of study (books, scores, paintings, artifacts, and oral traditions). According to Provine, the sources available to musicians and scholars of traditional Korean music are more comprehensive than those from comparable eras in China and Europe. Musicians and scholars also may rely on current performances of Korean traditional music, recordings, and master musicians.

A heavily-illustrated description of a number of important traditional musical instruments (such as kayagŭm, kŏmun’go, taegŭm, p’iri, and changgo) and a discussion of music genres (such as sanjo, p’ansori, sinawi, court music, and religious forms) make up the heart of the presentation. Videos and audio recordings of master performers will show the tradition in its purest form. Provine will also provide examples of contemporary music that draws upon traditional instruments and genres, whether using non-Korean instruments to play Korean music, Korean instruments to play non-Korean music, new compositions in traditional styles, and various levels of “fusion” music.

Provine also considers the importance of traditional music to modern Korea and its sense of identity. He suggests that though Korean traditional music is special to Korea and quite unlike the music of other cultures, it appeals to listeners worldwide, and is thus a special marker of the strength of Korean culture, in a way that Korean expertise in non-Korean music (such as Western classical music) or fusion cannot be.

10,000 Threads: The Collected Works of Quilt Master Kim Haeja

February 22—March 31, 2011

Traditional Korean quilting, with its unique “nubi” line-stitching, is elevated to a high art under the masterful hands of award-winning artisan Haeja Kim. A designated holder of an Important Intangible Cultural Property award by the Korean government for her efforts at preserving Korea’s artistic heritage, Kim meticulously line-stitches layers of batting and fabric into fine garments and coverings. The tiny stitches are employed over each article in a deceptively simple pattern, with smaller stitching highly valued and the mark of a true expert.Gallery Opening
Tuesday, February 22
6-8PM

RSVP

Nubi textiles are thought to have originated among Buddhist monks, who valued its strength, simplicity, and insulation against Korea’s frigid winters. Lay people employed it for traditional dress and soldiers for defense against the cold and added physical protection. However, the hand-craft of nubi largely disappeared in modern times with the introduction of the sewing machine.

Master Kim has been breathing new life into the art ever since she surprised visitors to the Korea Annual Traditional Art Exhibition two decades ago with 3mm-5mm nubi stitchwork—a feat, not seen for a century, that won the Prime Minister’s Award. Today, she is much sought after as a teacher and master of the form. In her humble and elegant rural studio, surrounded by attentive student apprentices, she displays a unique dedication to craft, hand-processing her fabrics with natural dyes like indigo, safflower, and charcoal. Her work has been exhibited in Korea, Japan, China, and France. This exhibition at The Korea Society represents Kim’s first major U.S. showing.

The items selected for this special showing are grouped in three parts:

Children’s Clothing—February 22-March 4

Adult Clothing—March 7-18

Children’s Ceremonial Clothing—March 21-31

An Alternative History of the Korean Home

Though Koreans have largely abandoned traditional housing, important elements of the Korean hanok house persist in the modern apartments favored by an increasingly urban population, according to Bong Hee Jeon, professor of architecture at Seoul National University. According to Professor Jeon, three of these elements—underfloor heating (ondol), raised wooden floors (maru), and the kitchen (puŏk)—even predate the hanok and have been part of Korean living spaces for much of the long history of human habitation on the Peninsula. In a lecture for The Korea Society’s Korea In-Depth lecture series, Professor Jeon explores the periodical, national, and regional manifestations of these archetypal spatial elements, and provides examples of how they are incorporated into current living conditions.

Thursday, March 17 @ 6:30 PM

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Mapping Identity: Antiquarian Korean Maps of the MacLean Collection

Richard Pegg, Asian art curator of Chicago’s MacLean Collection, examines Korean maps in a variety of formats, the challenges faced by cartographers, and the formation of multiple identities in Korea during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The MacLean Collection, housed in a private museum outside Chicago, focuses on the cultures of Korea, China, and Southeast Asia.
Tuesday, March 22
6:30PM Gallery Talk and Q&A

RSVP FOR EXPLORE KOREA CARDHOLDERS

Explore Korea cardholders attend this program for free!
All other cardholders and non-members must buy tickets.

BUY TICKETS

Asia Week 2011 Gallery Talk
Mapping Identity: Antiquarian Korean Maps of the MacLean Collection

The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor

$10 (Members/Students); $20 (Guests)
(Walk-in registration will incur an additional charge of $5)


About the Speaker

Richard A. Pegg, is co-author of The MacLean Collection: Chinese Ritual Bronzes and is managing editor of the second book in the series, Protecting Wisdom: Tibetan Book Covers in the MacLean Collection. He frequently lectures at major museums on Asian art. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University

THREADING LIFE: A Lecture by Quilt master Haeja Kim

Traditional Korean quilt technique requires keen attention to detail, patience, and dedication. With the arrival of the modern sewing machine, traditional quilting largely disappeared, yet master Kim Haeja remains steadfastly committed to the traditional ways of her craft. Designated Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 107 by the Korean government, Haeja Kim shares life’s lessons learned in the crafting of her quilts and textiles.
Thursday, March 24
6:30PM Gallery Talk and Q&A

RSVP FOR EXPLORE KOREA CARDHOLDERS

Explore Korea cardholders attend this program for free!
All other cardholders and non-members must buy tickets.

BUY TICKETS

Asia Week 2011 Gallery Talk

THREADING LIFE: A Lecture by Quilt master Haeja Kim

with

Haeja Kim
Korean Traditional Quilt Artist, Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 107

The Korea Society
950 Third Avenue @ 57th Street, 8th Floor

$5 (Student Member); $10 (Member/Student Non-Member);$20 (Non-Member)
(Walk-in registration will incur an additional charge of $5)


About the Speaker

Born in 1953, Haeja Kim received Korea’s designation as Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 107 at age 40 for her mastery of nubi. As the leading master in the field, Kim employs remarkable skill and tireless devotion in preserving Korean quilt techniques. In 1992, Kim presented traditional three millimeter (0.1-inch) and five millimeter nubi stitch work—techniques that hadn’t been seen in almost 100 years—at Korea’s Annual Traditional Art Handcraft Exhibition. Her presentation won her the Prime Minister’s Award.

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